Brisbane city skyline and Brisbane River at dusk in Australia

The best holiday destinations in Australia

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Tural Musayev 03 November 2021
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Romantic holiday destinations Australia is a dreamland for many people. From the holy stories of the Aboriginal Dreamtime, when the great spirits conjured the coral reefs, rainforests, and red deserts, to armchair travellers who identify Australia as their ideal trip, Australia is deserving of all the attention. Australia, the world's smallest continent and biggest island, is about the same size as the United States, but with a population of New York State and some of the world's strangest animals.

Australia is a land of incredible contrasts and breathtaking beauty. Therefore you can find beautiful holiday destinations near Australia. Along the coast, you can visit vibrant cities, vast sand islands, ancient rainforests, and the Great Barrier Reef, one of the world's most awe-inspiring natural wonders. Rugged national parks and red-earthed deserts in the Outback provide the ultimate adventure travel.

With a laid-back vibe and friendly people, it's no surprise that Australia is at the top of bucket lists all over the world. With our list of Australia's top attractions, you can create your adventures. However, don't forget about visa to Australia, and that you can get detailed information about it on the "Services" section of our website.

Family holiday destinations Australia:

1. Kakadu National Park

kakadu national park

Kakadu National Park is one of the best short holiday destinations Australia. It is the world's second-largest national park, covering more than 19,840 square kilometres in the Northern Territory. Monsoon rainforests, mangrove swamps, rivers, gorges, ancient rock paintings, marshes, and waterfalls can all be found within its limits.

Kakadu is also home to a diverse range of fauna. In addition to the numerous mammals, reptiles, and fish, the wetlands are home to over 300 different species of birds and freshwater and saltwater crocodiles.

Take a cruise along the waterways or hike the park's vast network of trails to learn more about the park's diverse ecosystems. A scenic flight is also an option.

2. Daintree National Park

daintree national park

Daintree National Park in Far North Queensland, a Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, is one of the world's oldest ecosystems. The Eastern Kuku Yalanji Aboriginal people own the land, and many of its natural characteristics have spiritual importance.

Mossman Gorge, where crystal-clear streams flow over granite boulders, and Cape Tribulation, one of holiday destinations near Australia, are the two main areas of the park. Along the white sand beaches of the Coral Sea, the jungle meets the reef. This breathtaking stretch of coastline is one of the few spots on the earth where two of the world's most diverse ecosystems meet.

More than 18,000 plant species and various animal species make up the park's incredible biodiversity, including the cassowary, crocodile, giant blue Ulysses butterfly, and the elusive Bennett's tree kangaroo.

3. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

uluru-kata tjuta national park

Uluru (formerly Ayers Rock) is one of Australia holiday destinations, located deep in the country's Red Centre. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, a World Heritage Site jointly managed by Parks Australia and the traditional landowners, the Anangu people, is home to the striking red monolith.

Uluru, which in local Aboriginal dialect means "shadowy place," rises 348 meters above the surrounding plain. The majority of it is buried beneath the earth's surface.

4. Sydney Harbour Bridge

sydney harbour bridge

The Sydney Harbour Bridge, along with the Opera House, is one of Australia's most famous architectural landmarks and romantic holiday destinations Australia. This massive structure, affectionately known as "Coathanger," is the world's largest steel arch bridge.

A guided ascent to the top of the bridge, where you can enjoy spectacular views of the harbour and city, is one of the top things to do in Sydney. The bridge connects Sydney's North Shore to the central business district, rising 134 meters above the harbor and spanning 500 meters. Two railway lines and eight lanes for road traffic extend over the bridge in addition to the pedestrian path.

Visit the museum on the southeastern pier for an overview of the bridge's history and construction.

5. K'Gari (Fraser Island)

fraser island

The World Heritage-listed K'Gari (Fraser Island) is one of Australia's most unusual destinations. It is the world's largest sand island, located between Bundaberg and Brisbane off Australia's east coast. There are limitless lengths of sand and water, turquoise lakes, emerald rainforests, undulating dunes, and amazing fauna to be found here.

Are you looking for a surge of adrenaline? One of Australia's greatest outdoor excursions is a 4WD trip along its surf-battered shores. The rusting hulls of shipwrecks, the variegated sandstone cliffs of The Cathedrals, and the bubbling fish-filled rock pools known as Champagne Pools may all be found along the windswept Seventy Five Mile Beach.

It's just as exciting to go inland. Crystal-clear freshwater creeks and lakes, some fed by springs, others perched amid towering dunes, are among the highlights, as are ancient rainforests teeming with an incredible diversity of plants and animals.

6. Melbourne's Culture

melbourne skyline

Melbourne, Australia's second-biggest city, is a favourite visit for many tourists, particularly cultural vultures. The primary charms of this elegant city on the Yarra River are its galleries, theatre, restaurants, shopping, and its decidedly European flair. It's also a green metropolis, with over a third of its entire area dedicated to parks, gardens, and open areas.

Melbourne's cultural highlights are numerous. Explore the National Gallery of Victoria's masterpieces, attend a performance at Arts Centre Melbourne, or visit Federation Square. At the Ian Potter Gallery, you can view Australian artworks, and at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, you can learn about the country's screen culture (ACMI).

Do you want to reconnect with nature? At the Royal Botanic Gardens, take the Aboriginal Heritage Walk. Catch a game at the Melbourne Cricket Ground if sports culture is on your mind. Cricket is the preferred sport in the summer, while Australian Rules football is the preferred sport in the winter.

Melbourne has a long and illustrious history. You can see it in the grand Victorian buildings built with gold rush funds, and you can feel it when shopping in the exquisite arcades and Queen Victoria Market, which has been selling products to Melburnians for almost a century.

7. Bondi Beach

bondi beach

When you combine bronzed bodies, blond sand, backpackers, and surf, you have one of the world's most well-known beaches. Bondi Beach is a great place to get a taste of Sydney's beach culture, and it's only 15 minutes from the city centre. On a hot summer day, soak up the sun on the golden sands, surf the waves, or cool off in the pool (but stay between the flags).

Few cities in the world can boast of having such an inviting stretch of sand and sea so close to their centre. It's no surprise that it's one of Sydney's best beaches. You'll also find some history here: Bondi is home to one of the world's oldest surf lifesaving clubs.

Away from the beach, Bondi offers a diverse range of activities. Take a walk along the coastal path from Bondi to Bronte. It starts at the southern end of the beach and runs for six scenic kilometres along the cliffs of sandstone. You'll also find plenty of cafes and restaurants nearby if you work up an appetite. You can also go on a Sunday market hunt for bargains or swim laps in the ocean pool.

8. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

great barrier reef marine park

The Great Barrier Reef is among family holiday destinations Australia. This natural wonder, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is one of the world's largest living structures. It's a bucket list destination for divers, snorkelers, island enthusiasts, and nature lovers.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park was established in 1975 to protect the reef's delicate ecosystems. More than 3,000 coral reefs, 600 continental islands, including the stunning Whitsunday group, 300 coral cays, and inshore mangrove islands.

The park, which stretches for 2,300 kilometres along Queensland's east coast (roughly the distance between Mexico and Vancouver), is one of the world's seven natural wonders.

The Great Barrier Reef is, unsurprisingly, one of Australia's best diving and snorkelling destinations. Soft and hard corals, more than 1,600 tropical fish species, sharks, dugongs, dolphins, turtles, rays, and giant clams are among the amazing array of marine life. Do you prefer to be dry? Underwater viewing stations and glass bottom boats provide views of the reef.

9. Blue Mountains National Park

blue mountains national park

The magnificent Blue Mountains National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a hiker's dream and a popular day excursion from Sydney. It is located 81 kilometres west of the city.

This beautiful park preserves more than 664,000 acres of wilderness and is named for the blue haze arising from the numerous eucalyptus trees. You may discover spectacular gorges, waterfalls, Aboriginal rock art, and 140 kilometers of hiking trails during your time here.

The Three Sisters, a group of towering sandstone rock formations in Blue Mountains National Park, are the park's most well-known attraction. The world's steepest railway, the Katoomba Scenic Railway, whisks passengers down the Jamison Valley through a cliff-side tunnel into an ancient rainforest; and the Skyway, Scenic Cableway, and Scenic Walkway, all of which provide elevated views of the dense forests.

Popular activities in the park include hiking, abseiling, rock climbing, mountain biking, and horseback riding.

10. Sydney Opera House

sydney opera house

When most people think of Sydney, Australia, they think of the Opera House. This renowned structure on Sydney's Bennelong Point, shaped like enormous shells or billowing sails, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the world's great architectural symbols.

Jorn Utzon, a Danish architect, won an international competition for the design but had to abandon the project due to technical and financial issues. The project was finally completed in 1973, at a cost ten times higher than the original estimate. Utzon had left the country by this time, never to return to see his magnificent creation.

Today, you can attend a performance, dine in one of the restaurants, or take a guided tour of the Sydney Opera House's highlights. Theatres, studios, a concert hall, exhibition rooms, and a cinema are all part of the structure.

The Sydney Opera House's interior is fascinating, but its striking architecture is best seen from afar. Mrs Macquarie's Chair in the Royal Botanic Gardens is one of the best places to photograph this popular Sydney tourist attraction, or you can take a harbour cruise or ferry and photograph it from the water.

The Sydney Opera House is currently undergoing a 10-year, $275-million restoration, but it will remain operational throughout the process.

Pick your Australia holiday destinations, and rely on us - Pickvisa.com for visa issues. I hope you find this article helpful. Pickvisa wishes you safe and happy travel. Be safe and happy!

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